Cemetery Exploring With Akari

Workers and players have earned their repose. Soon on their names all in vain we shall call, For even the grandest old landmarks must fall. Just a warm hand-clasp ere one disappears--- These are the last of the old pioneers. John Sandes Turn off the Castlemaine to Maldon road onto the gravel Sandy Creek road … Continue reading Cemetery Exploring With Akari

Local Cemetery Exploration

This Sutton Grange Cemetery enjoys scenic views across to Mount Alexander and the green stone quarry of special significance to the aboriginal people who first lived here. What used to be a thriving town during the prosperous days of the early 19th century, Sutton Grange has now been reduced to a population of around 150 people, … Continue reading Local Cemetery Exploration

Waltz With Matilda

Inexplicably, driving with Akari out to Moliagul, photographing an old thunder box (outdoor toilet) and a long abandoned house, filled me with the urge to wander further with my dogs sniff mapping. It made me think of swagmen and the much loved Waltzing Matilda. Once a jolly swagman camped by a Billabong Under the shade … Continue reading Waltz With Matilda

Akari’s Mystery Tour

Definition: a mystery tour is a short journey that people make for pleasure without knowing where they are going Akari, my 2008 Mazda 3, specialises in magical mystery tours that feed the soul and the creative spirit. Akari knows all about duende, that raw, tempestuous creative energy that flamenco guitarists, gypsies and dancers are familiar with. Her … Continue reading Akari’s Mystery Tour

Chinese Cemetery Vaughan Springs

In 1861, there were more than 24,000 Chinese immigrants on the Victorian goldfields of Ararat, Ballarat, Beechworth, Bendigo, Castlemaine and Maryborough.  Vaughan Springs was once a large gold rush town called "the Junction". Many Chinese miners moved there in 1854 and searched for alluvial gold in areas that had been abandoned by the Europeans. They … Continue reading Chinese Cemetery Vaughan Springs

Unknown Goldfields Miners Grave

'Since Saturday morning, the scene (on the goldfields) has greatly changed - then a tent would be seen here and there, but now they are becoming inconveniently crowded ... On Saturday, dozens were arriving at a time; on Sunday, hundreds; Monday and Tuesday, one continuous line of new arrivals.' Argus, 8 November 1851 KALIMNA PARK … Continue reading Unknown Goldfields Miners Grave

Geological Lesson in Castlemaine

  "This upward facing fold, called an anticline, is a nice example of how the gold-bearing strata in the Victorian goldfields are folded. The curved stratum, about 50 cm thick, is composed of sandstone and interpreted to have been deposited as a turbidite—an underwater sediment-rich, turbulence deposit. This particular one involved a lot of sand and … Continue reading Geological Lesson in Castlemaine

Who Castlemaine Remembers

"The past does not lie down and decay like a dead animal. It waits for you to find it again and again." "The Gilda Stories" ~Jewelle Gomez At the time when I was running the Soul Food Cafe I created a number of features which are stored in the Box of Wonderment. One was The Dig … Continue reading Who Castlemaine Remembers

Things I Love About Castlemaine

Many years ago, in another life, in a parallel universe, I gave my heart and soul to the creation of the Soul Food Cafe. The Creativity Portal was just one major site that featured the work that I was doing.  Facebook completely changed the online environment and the shift that came with it, along with … Continue reading Things I Love About Castlemaine

Germ of Australian Independence

Much is made of the Eureka Stockade, a rebellion that took place in Ballarat. However, 160 years ago, in 1851, 15,000 protesters gathered on the Forest Creek diggings in central Victoria to object to higher gold license fees. This gathering took place at what has come to be known as the Monster Meeting place at … Continue reading Germ of Australian Independence

Treasure Hunting in Blanket Gully Road

Ochre was the most important painting material used traditionally by Aboriginal people. It is mined from particular sites and is a crumbly to hard rock heavily coloured by iron oxide. The source material was traded extensively across Australia in the past, with some material traveling many hundreds or even thousands of kilometres from where it … Continue reading Treasure Hunting in Blanket Gully Road

Winter on Mt Franklin (Lalgambook)

Mt Franklin, known as Lalgambook to the Dja Dja Warrung people, is a small volcanic crater that offers ideal place for a picnic set amongst plantings of huge conifers and deciduous trees that create an exotic atmosphere. It offers a fine example of a breached scoria cone. The breach, through which the road now enters the crater, is … Continue reading Winter on Mt Franklin (Lalgambook)

The Gower School Ruins

I have no particular talent! I am only passionately curious Einstein In 1912 the Gowar township was gazetted, but little came of it. Gowar is a rural locality 7 km south-east of Maldon. It was known as Muckleford North until 1880, but one hundred years later Muckleford North has probably become the name more often … Continue reading The Gower School Ruins

Forest Creek Diggings

Forest Creek Historic Gold diggings is situated mid-way between Castlemaine and Chewton. This historic mining site is in the Castlemaine Diggings National Heritage Park, and there is to do free of charge. A 400-metre walk allows you to discover how miners won gold from Forest Creek. The walk commences at a small shed below which … Continue reading Forest Creek Diggings

Scar Trees and Battle Coats

Scarred trees are trees which have had bark removed by indigenous Australians for the creation of bark canoes, shelters, shields and containers, such as coolamons. They are among the easiest-to-find archaeological sites in Australia. I have been out and about with the dogs and while they sniff map I am capturing images of some (modified) … Continue reading Scar Trees and Battle Coats