Honouring The Pioneers

Henry Lawson's The Drover's Wife is an Australian classic that depicts life for the early Australian pioneers. McCubbin’s monumental painting The pioneer reflects the self-conscious nationalism of the years immediately following Federation. Each panel is ‘read’ to link the progress of toil on this land across time. The first panel shows a pioneering couple in … Continue reading Honouring The Pioneers

Local Cemetery Exploration

This Sutton Grange Cemetery enjoys scenic views across to Mount Alexander and the green stone quarry of special significance to the aboriginal people who first lived here. What used to be a thriving town during the prosperous days of the early 19th century, Sutton Grange has now been reduced to a population of around 150 people, … Continue reading Local Cemetery Exploration

Two Feuding Volcanoes

The land around here is ancient. About 480 million years ago it was all under the sea. Then a couple of tectonic plates collided deep underground, squeezing everything like a vice. I love the idea of sitting on the top of Tarrengower reading the story, as told by Justice B Nelson, and published by Culture … Continue reading Two Feuding Volcanoes

Germ of Australian Independence

Much is made of the Eureka Stockade, a rebellion that took place in Ballarat. However, 160 years ago, in 1851, 15,000 protesters gathered on the Forest Creek diggings in central Victoria to object to higher gold license fees. This gathering took place at what has come to be known as the Monster Meeting place at … Continue reading Germ of Australian Independence

Treasure Hunting in Blanket Gully Road

Ochre was the most important painting material used traditionally by Aboriginal people. It is mined from particular sites and is a crumbly to hard rock heavily coloured by iron oxide. The source material was traded extensively across Australia in the past, with some material traveling many hundreds or even thousands of kilometres from where it … Continue reading Treasure Hunting in Blanket Gully Road

Leanganook (Mt Alexander) Stone People

Rising 350 metres above the surrounding area, Mount Alexander (Leanganook) Regional Park is a prominent landmark offering magnificent views and a natural forest setting for picnics and bushwalking. It also provides important habitat for several rare or threatened species. On a bitterly cold winter day the mountain took on a spiritual quality. It was enough … Continue reading Leanganook (Mt Alexander) Stone People

Winter on Mt Franklin (Lalgambook)

Mt Franklin, known as Lalgambook to the Dja Dja Warrung people, is a small volcanic crater that offers ideal place for a picnic set amongst plantings of huge conifers and deciduous trees that create an exotic atmosphere. It offers a fine example of a breached scoria cone. The breach, through which the road now enters the crater, is … Continue reading Winter on Mt Franklin (Lalgambook)

Conversations Trees Have Overheard

Scar trees like the one shown here are precious remnants of the past practices of the Djadjawurrung a people whose land we now live upon. While Arch and Neeks potter I may stop to have a conversation with these trees and learn a little of what they have overheard - the grief they have felt, the … Continue reading Conversations Trees Have Overheard