Two Feuding Volcanoes

The land around here is ancient. About 480 million years ago it was all under the sea. Then a couple of tectonic plates collided deep underground, squeezing everything like a vice. I love the idea of sitting on the top of Tarrengower reading the story, as told by Justice B Nelson, and published by Culture … Continue reading Two Feuding Volcanoes

The Stones and Ground Here Tells Stories

Recently I have taken to exploring cemeteries.  A taphophile, otherwise known as Tombstone tourist, cemetery enthusiast, detective or graver is an individual who has a passion for and enjoyment of cemeteries, epitaphs, gravestone rubbing, photography, art, and history of (famous) deaths. I am not sure I will become a taphophile but I can see how visiting cemeteries … Continue reading The Stones and Ground Here Tells Stories

Unknown Goldfields Miners Grave

'Since Saturday morning, the scene (on the goldfields) has greatly changed - then a tent would be seen here and there, but now they are becoming inconveniently crowded ... On Saturday, dozens were arriving at a time; on Sunday, hundreds; Monday and Tuesday, one continuous line of new arrivals.' Argus, 8 November 1851 KALIMNA PARK … Continue reading Unknown Goldfields Miners Grave

Was She Robert Burns Granddaughter?

And fare thee well, my only Luve And fare thee well, a while! And I will come again, my Luve, Tho' it were ten thousand mile. Robert Burns Robert Burns, the celebrated Scottish poet, had 12 children by four women - nine by his wife Jean Armour. Seven of his children were illegitimate, including the … Continue reading Was She Robert Burns Granddaughter?

May They Have Found Peace

And when great souls die, after a period peace blooms Maya Angelou   On a quiet country back road, near the Newstead General Cemetery, lie two burial markers of interest. One is simply called Chinese Ground. The Chinese were not welcome on the Australian goldfields. They were thorough workers, often picking meticulously through the discarded … Continue reading May They Have Found Peace

A Window to the Past

A graveyard can be a great place to explore local history and genealogy, or just take a peaceful late winter walk. So let’s grab our coats and cameras and head out to the nearest cemetery to learn about local history! How to Explore a Graveyard In a piece called Travel With a Purpose Angela Dollar … Continue reading A Window to the Past

Tonight I Write the Saddest Lines

Tonight I can write the saddest lines. To think that I do not have her. To feel that I have lost her. Pablo Neruda What are the saddest lines?  Neruda expresses the grief of lost love! If you believe the Weekly Times the story of the Daylesford lost boys is one of the saddest stories in … Continue reading Tonight I Write the Saddest Lines

Geological Lesson in Castlemaine

  "This upward facing fold, called an anticline, is a nice example of how the gold-bearing strata in the Victorian goldfields are folded. The curved stratum, about 50 cm thick, is composed of sandstone and interpreted to have been deposited as a turbidite—an underwater sediment-rich, turbulence deposit. This particular one involved a lot of sand and … Continue reading Geological Lesson in Castlemaine

Mixing with Trees

"A forest is much more than what you see," says ecologist Suzanne Simard. Her 30 years of research in Canadian forests have led to an astounding discovery -- trees talk, often and over vast distances. Learn more about the harmonious yet complicated social lives of trees and prepare to see the natural world with new … Continue reading Mixing with Trees

Spring is Coming

Tolstoy wrote in Anna Karenina that “spring is the time of plans and projects.” With  the passing of equinox, July inspires us to seriously lift our game. Slow, cosy winter days are replaced with big plans for action.  There are many  spots to find little signs that Spring is coming. Here, in July, in the … Continue reading Spring is Coming

Who Castlemaine Remembers

"The past does not lie down and decay like a dead animal. It waits for you to find it again and again." "The Gilda Stories" ~Jewelle Gomez At the time when I was running the Soul Food Cafe I created a number of features which are stored in the Box of Wonderment. One was The Dig … Continue reading Who Castlemaine Remembers

Things I Love About Castlemaine

Many years ago, in another life, in a parallel universe, I gave my heart and soul to the creation of the Soul Food Cafe. The Creativity Portal was just one major site that featured the work that I was doing.  Facebook completely changed the online environment and the shift that came with it, along with … Continue reading Things I Love About Castlemaine

Germ of Australian Independence

Much is made of the Eureka Stockade, a rebellion that took place in Ballarat. However, 160 years ago, in 1851, 15,000 protesters gathered on the Forest Creek diggings in central Victoria to object to higher gold license fees. This gathering took place at what has come to be known as the Monster Meeting place at … Continue reading Germ of Australian Independence

Treasure Hunting in Blanket Gully Road

Ochre was the most important painting material used traditionally by Aboriginal people. It is mined from particular sites and is a crumbly to hard rock heavily coloured by iron oxide. The source material was traded extensively across Australia in the past, with some material traveling many hundreds or even thousands of kilometres from where it … Continue reading Treasure Hunting in Blanket Gully Road

Nature’s Rock Art

In ancient India lived a sculptor renowned for his life-sized statues of elephants. With trunks curled high, tusks thrust forward, thick legs trampling the earth, these carved beasts seemed to trumpet the sky. One day, a king came to see these magnificent works and to commission statuary for his palace. Struck with wonder, he asked … Continue reading Nature’s Rock Art